15/10/2018
Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

How To Tackle Condensation In Your Tent

17ad8bb3-e00d-4319-ac25-6521a93b5084

Condensation is a natural and unavoidable part of outdoor living.

The build-up of moisture can be managed but not eradicated so there’s no point in getting too hung up about it.

Follow our quick tips to help you deal with condensation in your tent

  • Don’t confuse condensation with a leak in your tent. Just because water is dripping from the roof, it doesn’t mean it’s come from outside.
  • Take some absorbent cloths to wipe down condensation before it starts dripping.
  • Ventilation is key. Panels (usually mesh-backed) at the rear and above doors and windows allow air to flow through the tent without letting rain in. Leave the panels open as much as possible to keep condensation down to a minimum.
  • A sewn-in groundsheet can prevent air from circulating freely. Unfortunately, without one your tent could be cold and wet inside, so you’ll have to balance up the pros and cons.
  • Don’t cook inside your tent. This rule applies for several important safety reasons but it will also keep moisture levels down. The steam from cooking generates lots of condensation.
  • Likewise avoid eating hot food inside your tent as the heat and steam will add to the problem.
  • Be anti-social and don’t have visitors round. A large number of people breathing in your tent will cause moisture build-up.
  • Sheltering from the rain with all the doors, windows and vents closed and a heater blasting out hot air sounds tempting but will generate loads of condensation.
  • Avoid bringing wet gear and clothing into the tent. Put it in the car boot if you can, or leave it in the front porch.
  • Try to air off sleeping mats and sleeping bags every morning.
  • When packing up, try to dry your tent fly and groundsheet. Even if it hasn’t been raining both will be damp with condensation.

 

 

 

Back to "Practical Advice" Category

15/10/2018 Share this story   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

England’s Jurassic Coast offers stunning countryside,fossil hunting and miles of footpaths along cliffs and through hidden bays ...


Campsite Cooking: Banh Mi

A traditional Vietnamese Banh Mi is a spicy chicken sandwich on baguette that can be rustled up in half an ...


Me And My Tent: Outwell Concorde L

Take a tour of this fabulous reader's tent and get inspiration for your own camping set-up ...


Camping inspiration - 10 top campsites in Britain's national parks

Enjoy the fresh air and the beauty of the natural world when camping in one of Britain’s national parks ...


Other Articles

Staying healthy and safe on the campsite has always been essential, but these days it’s more vital than ever. Find out how to keep your family well ...


Fire safety advice for camping

Carelessness around open flames can be fatal, so follow these guidelines to stay safe on the campsite ...


The 5 best Dorset beaches to visit in your motorhome or caravan

Breathtaking scenery abounds on Dorset's Jurassic coast, with lots of wonderful beaches to visit ...


Paws On Site: Share your pet camping pics

Barbecue safety for furry four-legged friends! ...