05/02/2008 Share this review   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon

Mobilvetta Kea M71

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Key Features

  • Model Year : 2008
  • Class : Overcab Coachbuilt
  • Base Vehicle : Fiat Ducato
  • Berths : 7
  • Layout : Bunk Beds

The Verdict

It may only have four travel seats and six berths, but this is still a lot of practical motorhome for £40,000.

Score

AT A GLANCE

Mobilvetta Kea M71 2008

Pros
  • Bunk bed layout great for families
  • Seven berth
  • Lower bunk bed flips up for more garage space
  • Massive twin dinette lounge
Cons
  • Only four travel seats

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION

Model Year
2008
Manufacturer
Mobilvetta
Class
Overcab Coachbuilt
Range
Kea
Base Vehicle
Fiat Ducato
Height (m)
3.08
Berths
7
Maximum weight (kg)
Length (m)
7.35
Engine Size
Payload (kg)
Belted Seats
4
Price from (£)
40000
Width (m)
2.33
Price from (€)
Main Layout
Bunk Beds

DETAILED REVIEW

THE eight-strong Mobilvetta Kea range sees the familiar Top Driver range finally consigned to the history books.

Each comes with Fiat Ducato 130 Multijet underpinnings (with the big 160 engine as an option), and the range is split neatly into the M (overcab) and P (low-profile) ranges.

We’ve concentrated on the M71, with its whopping seven berths (albeit with the caveat of there being just the four belted travel seats) and stacked rear bunks, the lower one of which rises to open up a healthy amount of garage space.

What strikes you immediately with the Kea is its thoroughly modern-looking overcab moulding.

Where these can often look like bulbous after-thoughts, the M71’s is nicely shaped to complement the new Fiat cab, and sports a couple of rakish side windows to boot.

Your money also buys a fully colour-keyed bumper and some elegant dark silver graphics that successfully break up what would otherwise be vast tracts of white space on the exterior.

Inside, the pleasant blue upholstery and rich, dark cabinetry impress, the fiddly locker catches and too-high lounge rooflight less so, but it would take a true pedant to complain about the enormous twin-dinette lounge here.

The amidships kitchen is lacking in worktop space (small slide-out extension flap notwithstanding), but what space there is has been maximised by the clever implementation of a third spark-ignition gas burner set into the sink unit, meaning you can still boil a pan of water even if the cooker top is already being used to the full for food preparation.

The washroom looks extremely classy, even if the shower cubicle is a mite small, and the children will love the end bunks, especially the upper occupant, who gets a dedicated blown-air vent in addition to the usual window and reading light.

This article originally appeared in the November 2007 issue of Which Motorcaravan. To subscribe to the magazine, click here.